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Shield yourself from deadly "smart bugs"
article reprinted from August 2001

Research team discovers new way to kill deadly microbes
New bacterium destroys virulent and resistant microorganisms
In the near future, H. pylori may be immune to mainstream therapies
Lactic-acid bacteria may disrupt cancerous activity
Regular probiotic therapy strengthens your immune system
Meticulous results for a supplement that's six times stronger than other probiotics
Digestive disorders, viral infections, and skin conditions may benefit from regular probiotic therapy

The epidemic of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is not coming—it's already here! Billions of wild bacteria—deadly "smart bugs"—are reproducing and mutating at an uncontrollable rate. Each year, hospitals spread antibiotic-resistant bacteria to two million patients. 1  And even with a significant decrease in antibiotic use since 1995, the spread of resistant bacteria continues to skyrocket.

Research team discovers new way to kill deadly microbes
A team of researchers led by Iichiroh Ohhira, Ph.D., has turned to beneficial intestinal flora to help win the war against resistant bacteria. Scientists have traditionally assumed that the digestive systems mechanism for destroying pathogenic microbes was result of the good bacteria simply out-numbering the bad—large colonies of friendly flora deprive harmful microbes of necessary food and nutrients. However, recent studies show that these beneficial bacteria can also fight pathogenic microbes in ways scientists never suspected.

Through mechanisms researchers don't yet fully understand, good bacteria located in the gut boost the body's general immune response to microbial invaders outside of the digestive tract. 2  And, recent animal studies indicate that friendly intestinal bacteria may also ward off disease by improving liver function. Since the liver is one of the primary disease-fighting organs, researchers believe that boosting its defense mechanism may augment the body's ability to disarm and eliminate potentially deadly organisms.
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New bacterium destroys virulent and resistant microorganisms
Based on this research. Dr. Ohhira and his team at Okayama University developed a revolutionary probiotic (a supplement containing live beneficial organisms) with a new bacterial strain proven to destroy resistant pathogens.

They isolated a lactic-acid bacteria (LAB) strain known as Enterococcus faecalis TH 10 in tempeh, a Malaysian soy product. This bacterium was carefully isolated and fermented over a five-year period, as a longer fermentation period was shown to enhance its microbe-killing abilities. As a result of this inventive culturing process, TH 10 became potent enough to kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is responsible for many rapidly spreading infections occurring now in hospitals. 5   Conquering this virulent microbe has come at a critical juncture, as a few strains of S. aureus are already resistant to over 20 antibiotic compounds. Some scientists believe that research will soon be outpaced by the bacterium's ability to resist any new drugs that may be developed.6

TH 1O's ability to overcome MRSA is an important victory, but its advantages don't end there. Researchers have found that its antimicrobial capacity extends to a number of other antibiotic-resistant microbes.
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In the near future, H. pylori may be immune to mainstream therapies
For decades, ulcers were treated with a wide array of drugs and surgery, but only in recent years has mainstream medicine discovered that H. pylori, the bacteria associated with many types of ulcers, could quickly be eliminated with a short course of antibiotics. It wasn't long before the massive use of the therapy resulted in new strains of H. pylori that required longer courses of antibiotics. In some areas, antibiotic use has caused an increased resistance of almost 460 percent to one of the drugs—in as little as three years. 7

Early in vitro testing of Dr. Ohhira's formulation on H. pylori strains at the Department of Medicine of Monash University in Australia showed that TH 10 could inhibit all strains of the bacterium. While it's obvious that TH 10 works, the Australian researchers admitted that it was unclear how it was able to accomplish this. 8

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Lactic-acid bacteria may disrupt cancerous activity
Although the "superstar" of Dr. Ohhira's probiotic is TH 10, the other 11 bacteria in the product are also proven microbe killers. In fact, the anti carcinogenic activity of lactic-acid bacteria (LAB) in general is quite significant.

Since the beneficial bacteria are going to eventually settle in the intestinal tract, you might expect that colon cancer would be the only type of cancer affected by these organisms. While research shows that colonization by beneficial bacteria does have an inhibitory effect on colon cancer precursors, the friendly flora enforces the immune system's overall inhibitory effect on tumors and cancerous activity by neutralizing carcinogens, like nitrosamines. 9  Through stimulation of the general immune response, tumor generation may be reduced for other types of cancer.
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Regular probiotic therapy strengthens your immune system
Scientists are discovering that other illnesses not usually associated with intestinal flora may also be inhibited by Lactic Acid Bacteria (including TH 10). When animal and human test subjects are given probiotics containing lactic-acid bacteria, they build a stronger general immune system that can resist flu viral infections,10 salmonella bacterial infestations," and cell mutations that are precursors to intestinal tumors.12

Animal and in vitro studies conducted in Italy indicate that probiotics may also be useful in treating urinary tract infections, immune disorders, Candida vaginitis, lactose intolerance, high cholesterol levels, and food allergies.13

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Meticulous results for a supplement that's six times stronger than other probiotics
One of the difficulties in developing foods and supplements that contain live bacteria is that the bacteria may no longer be alive by the time you use the product due to improper packaging, exposing the bacteria to high heat during processing, or extended storage time without properly nourishing the bacteria.

To ensure the viability and potency of their bacteria, Dr. Ohhiras team developed a protective shell that keeps bacteria alive and free from infestation by harmful pathogens. Their special fermentation process is "cold" and doesn't expose the bacteria to high heat. Because of these meticulous culturing and packaging processes, Dr. Ohhira's tests show that his product is more than six times stronger than any other naturally occurring Lactic Acid Bacteria. This claim is based on research showing that 80 percent of all other probiotics are no longer alive by the time they reach the consumer. These painstaking manufacturing methods result in a product that has a guaranteed shelf-life of three years after shipment.
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Digestive disorders, viral infections, and skin conditions may benefit from regular probiotic therapy
In addition to supplying TH 10 and the other bacterial strains, this supplement—called Probiotics 12 Plus—provides 10 vitamins, eight minerals, four acids, and 18 amino acids. Each capsule contains approximately 780 million Lactic Acid Bacteria cells. Dosage depends on the condition being treated. More aggressive diseases, such as cancer, generally require a higher dose. But even at the highest dosage levels, the number of live cells falls under 9 billion. After an illness is brought under control, a lower maintenance dose is suggested.

Besides being helpful in treating the health conditions already listed, research suggests that Probiotics 12 Plus may also be useful in treating the following disorders: inflammatory bowel disease, colitis, Crohn's disease, spastic colon, constipation, diarrhea, and diverticulitis, acid reflux, heartburn, and peptic ulcers, asthma and cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Epstein-Barr virus, acne, psoriasis, and eczema, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis B and C.
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An information sheet included with the product has detailed information on dosages and the best time of day to take the supplement. Be sure to work with your doctor in determining how best to incorporate this treatment.

The Health Sciences Institute is dedicated to uncovering and researching the most urgent advances in modern underground medicine. Whether they come from a laboratory in Malaysia, a clinic in South America, or a university in Germany, our goal is to bring the treatments that work directly to the people who need them. We alert our members to exciting breakthroughs in medicine, show them exactly where to go to learn more, and help them understand how they and their families can benefit from these powerful discoveries.

References:
1 National Center for Infectious Disease, CDC
2 J Nutr, 130(2S Suppl):396S-402S, 2000
3 Am J Clin Nutr, 73(2 Suppl):380S-5S, 2001
4 Japanese Journal of Dairy and Food Sciences, 45(4), 1996
5 Antimicrobial Resistance, Data to Assess Public Health Threat from Resistant
Bacteria are Limited, pp. 30-1 and 33, General Accounting Office, April 1999
6 Japanese Journal of Dairy and Food Sciences, 45(4), 1996
7 Emerging Infectious Diseases, 3(385-9), 1997
8 Asia Pacific J Clin Nutr, 5:20-4, 1996
9 Immune Cell Biol, 78(1):80-8, 2000
10 Antonie V Leeuwenhoek, 76(1-4): 383-9, 1999
11 J Food Prof, 62(7):751-7, 1999
12 BratisI Lek Listy, 100(5),238-45, 1999
13 Int J Antimicrob Agents, 16(4):531-6, 2000